Cricket and Social Media, Part 4

(Parts one, two, and three are here, here, and here.)

This is it. This is the big one.

Below you will find everyone* on Twitter that covers cricket, in one aspect or another, sorted by number of followers, number of tweets, number of accounts following, and Twitter Strike Rate (Twitter SR).

*Not everyone who covers cricket, as I am sure I missed some. Please suggest any and all that I have missed and I will add them.

*

Note: Twitter Strike Rate is the term coined by @paperstargirl for the stat I invented,Β  formerly known as “Tweets per Follower” or “TPF”.

Simply put, Twitter Strike Rate is the number of tweets divided by the number of followers. The lower the number, the more effective the social media campaign…supposedly. It is by no means scientific.

As an example, ECB’s Twitter SR is .05, which means they are earning 20 followers per tweet. While mine is 9.95, so I am earning one follower every 10 tweets or so.

A few other quick notes before I post the results:

–Β  The list includes bloggers, journalists, editors, photographers, podcasters, and photojournalists, amongst others – the only really strict criteria I had was that the person’s main body of work had to be about the sport of cricket – just general sports journalists didn’t make the cut, for instance, though I am sure a couple slipped through. I made distinctions between each group in my master spreadsheet, but not in the spreadsheets below because in a lot of cases the line was just too thin, and I did not want to rub anyone the wrong way. I also think the work bloggers do is very important work, so I don’t want to degrade the hours they put in by putting them in a different class from journalists.

(That said, I believe that journalists have a role in cricket that simply cannot be replaced by a herd of amateur bloggers…but the blogger vs journalist debate is best left for another day.)

– I think the list is more or less complete, as far as active accounts are concerned, but it is by no means exhaustive. Please do not feel insulted if you are an active blogger but are not listed – just shoot me a note and I will get you up. Also please do let me know if you have suggestions for other accounts conspicuously absent from the lists.

– I also had to make a couple calls with regard to whether an ex-player-cum-commentator was a journalist or not. I made those decisions on a case by case basis. Ian Botham is not included but Sourav Ganguly is, for example. Again, it’s a grey area that I did my best with.

– The list was compiled over about a 10 day period, so things have of course changed for most of the accounts. Just a heads up there.

– As with the previous posts, this was a copy-and-paste job, so all errors are sics.

– Because this was done over a longer period of time, there will be some duplicates. I deleted all those that I could find, but I am sure I missed a couple.

– With very few exceptions, the lists are individuals only, not organizations or blog collectives such as The Sight Screen. I hope to do those in a later post.

– I politely recused myself from the competition.

– Ctrl-F works within the spreadsheets, if you want to search for yourself.

And so, without further ado, the results:

Number of Followers:

Number of Tweets:

*2.6 million total tweets.

Number of Accounts Following:

Twitter Strike Rate:

*

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19 Responses to Cricket and Social Media, Part 4

  1. tracer007 says:

    Reblogged this on Like a Tracer Bullet and commented:
    Good to know that I have a healthy strike rate….

  2. Marcia Malia says:

    Where’s Bumble?

  3. Chrisps says:

    Strangely compelling. Perhaps because I’m unused to featuring on lists like these. Did you make a conscious decision not to number the rows (I.e. provide a ranking)?

    I expect it to have an important practical benefit: when my wife says “you’re obsessed by cricket and twitter”, I can show her this post and point out that many others are much more obsessed than I am.

    I read an interesting article on distributions and the internet – showing that ‘normal’ distributions are not the norm: http://pulse.me/s/gYBNg I guess if you plotted the follower figures, that would be the case here, too.

    • Matt says:

      Ha – glad I could help you out on the homestead. And thanks for link…interesting stuff for sure.

      And to be honest, I didn’t even think about ranking them. I might actually do that.

  4. Baiju says:

    Nice stats, May be u can add me too… πŸ™‚

  5. Bradley Adams says:

    Maybe it’s just me being slightly selfish… but me maybe? *92% of my tweets are about cricket.. @Bradley_Adams44

    *That is my estimation.

  6. Arp says:

    You left Ramesh Srivats in that list I suppose

  7. Ric Finlay says:

    You don’t include tweets by cricket statisticians in your analysis? – people such as Mohan Menon, S Rajesh, and dare I say it, myself ….

  8. I actually quite liked those stats, I’m not sure if it’s because I featured and because I’ve been considering how best to publicize my blog and I’m not sure how apart from Twittering, or if it is just the statistician inside every cricket fan which appreciates this sort of thing.

    One thing, though. You’ll never encompass the entire cricket tweeters, there are simply too many of them! πŸ™‚

  9. Nishant says:

    Tweet a lot on cricket & have a dedicated cricket blog as well πŸ™‚
    Dont know where I would feature in these lists if at all πŸ™‚
    Twitter handle @NishantSKumar & blog http://www.batball2cricket.blogspot.in/

  10. Matt says:

    Cheers! I will get you up and start following your blog. Thanks for reading and commenting.

    And please do let me know if you I missed anyone else…

  11. Dan says:

    Feel free to give us a follow. http://www.themiddlestump.com or @themiddlestump on Twitter

  12. I like the Twitter strike rate functionality shown for the Journalists, bloggers page. Pretty innovative!

  13. We are Cricket’s very own Social network . Launching in 4 weeks time. Do check it out and sign up to get early access

  14. Pingback: Under Blue Skies: 2013, A Year in Review | Limited Overs

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